Ana Feeds Our World, Part 27

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 27

Algae provide a sustainable protein source for animal feed, but is it good enough protein? Comprehensive medical and nutritional studies have demonstrated that many different types of algae produce high quality proteins that are comparable to alternative protein sources. All proteins are not created equal. Proteins…

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 26

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 26

Algae biomass provides excellent nutritional value for biofeed. Lipids are long carbon chain molecules. Lipids store energy for the plant and serve as the structural components of cells. Proteins are large organic compounds made of amino acids arranged in a linear chain connected by peptide bonds. The plant’s genetic code…

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 25

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 25

In spite of the numerous advantages associated with organic food production, less than 1% of the world’s croplands are farmed organically. About 4% of the European Union’s farms, where farmers receive subsidies to use organic methods, practice organic farming. The US has only 0.8% of cropland…

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 24

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 24

Ana’s quest to resolve world hunger cannot ignore the billons of committed carnivores that eat millions of tons of meat and dairy products. Increased consumption of animal proteins creates a towering demand for animal feed to grow animal protein for people.In 30 years, algae meat substitutes will…

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 23

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 23

Smartcultures address food production challenges with sustainable solutions. The core concept comes from Aristotle, who suggested using nature’s way: “If one way be better than another, that you may be sure is nature’s way.” —Aristotle Smartcultures mimic nature by employing nature’s original…

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 22

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 22

The post–World War II, Green Agricultural Revolution increased crop yields, but half our global population currently suffers from caloric and micronutrient deficiencies. Many people consume thousands of empty calories, yet remain malnourished and obese because their diet is deficient in essential vitamins…

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 21

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 21

In spite of the numerous advantages associated with organic food production, less than 1% of the world’s croplands are farmed organically. About 4% of European Union’s farms, where farmers receive subsidies to use organic methods, practice organic farming. The US has only 0.8% of cropland and…

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 20

Leonardo was right. Our modern society spends 100 times more on space. NASA has a $18.3 billion budget, but the USDA invests practically nothing on soil research. Ancient, as well as current indigenous civilizations worshipped the soil as the foundry of life. Proof of soil veneration comes from the Latin…

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 19

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 19

ZooPoo will benefit zoo visitors of every age. The learning facility will serve as a gathering point for environmental and socially conscious networks. ZooPoo provides engaging learning opportunities for people interested in carbon neutral production of food and energy, ecologically sensitive lifestyles as well…

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 18

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 18

ZooPoo includes the liquid and solid the wastes from animals, plants and zoo trash. The exhibits will use about 60% virtual – videos, and 40% interactive. Waste-to-energy videos will provide guests with sights of amazing processes using big screens that avoid the required footprint, odors and the noise…

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 17

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 17

Many animals, plants and entire ecosystems are threatened with extinction due to global climate change, food costs, freshwater scarcity and the availability of fossil fuels and fossil nutrients (i.e. fertilizers). ZooPoo addresses each of these challenges and shows visitors how to change their own behaviors…

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 16

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 16

Nature has used biological regeneration sustainably for eons because nature recycles and reuses nutrients over and over again. Bioremediation paired with bioregeneration operates on nature’s basic principle that there is no such thing as waste. “Your waste is my food.” Waste carbon and nutrients become the food…

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 15

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 15

Carbon pollution can be found in abundance in all the wrong places. Agriculture discharges carbon plumes, as do power plants that also release black smoke carbon particulates that pollute cities. Industry currently recycles metals, plastics and paper. The next logical step, recycling carbon, makes sense using…

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 14

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 14

A recent study estimated the cost of mitigating fertilizer pollution in the Mississippi River at $2.7 billion a year. The use of algae bioremediation in algae biosystems, could reduce that annual cost by a factor of at least 10. A wastewater bioremediation system uses algae raceways to allow algae to biosorb…

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 13

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 13

Bioremediation, nutrient recovery, serves as the critical first step in nutrient cycling. Most bioremediation research focuses on the capture of nutrients harmful to the environment, animals or people such as excess CO2, nitric oxides (NOx), polluted wastewater or toxic heavy metals…

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 12

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 12

Nutrient cycling provides the foundation for Ana’s quest to supply good food for hungry people. Nature wastes nothing by maintaining a closed nutrient loop. Each plant lives with nutrients passed down from organisms that lived earlier. When the plant or animal dies, it’s nutrients cycle…

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 11

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 11

The most critical contribution algae can make to MIA is to transform fossil agriculture, based on extracted resources, to abundant agriculture, based on biocycled resources. Fossil agriculture is not sustainable, because fossil resources are limited and becoming increasingly scarce…

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 10

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 10

Producing food grains to feed animals for meat requires 100 times more water than producing food for vegetarians. Meat production consumes 1,000 times more freshwater than using protein from algae. Algae do not require freshwater or arable land to grow, maximizing resources that…

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 9

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 9

Farmers have to make a full investment in their crop and pray that severe weather events, drought or pest invasions do not destroy it. A single storm, such as hurricane Harvey or Irma, a temperature spike or pest invasion can devastate crops. Modern Industrial Agriculture (MIA) ignores…

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 8

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 8

No, Ana cannot save modern industrial agriculture (MIA), from itself. MIA consumes far too many nonrenewable resources, uses them very inefficiently, and only once. The residuals leak to create massive waste streams that erode, degrade and pollute not only its own ecosystems…

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 7

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 7

Algae evolved in so many different competitive environments that the organisms built incredibly sophisticated defensive shields. Imagine each algae cell trying to survive and grow surrounded by a milieu of predators trying to eat it and trillions of bacteria, viruses, molds and other microorganisms…

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 6

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 6

Algae typically do not have to move, since the nutrients flow naturally in the water to them. Algae do not need rigid structures since they are supported by water. Amazingly, algae developed the ability to swim. Sometimes single-celled algae grow whip-like appendages called flagella, which coordinate …

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 5

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 5

Algae are aquatic microscopic plants with chlorophyll-a and a single-cell body not differentiated into roots, stems or leaves. Algae include some photosynthetic bacteria, the cyanobacteria. Algae’s photosynthetic mechanism is similar to land-based plants, except they are far more efficient in converting …

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 4

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 4

Tiny Mighty Al shares the story of how this 3.5-billion-year-old single-celled alga saved our planet not once, but twice. First, Al ate the predominately CO2 atmosphere and burped enough O2 to support life on earth. After supplying the oxygen, our planet lacked food. Al became the favored food…

Next Page »