Ana Feeds Our World, Part 15

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 15

Carbon pollution can be found in abundance in all the wrong places. Agriculture discharges carbon plumes, as do power plants that also release black smoke carbon particulates that pollute cities. Industry currently recycles metals, plastics and paper. The next logical step, recycling carbon, makes sense using…

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 14

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 14

A recent study estimated the cost of mitigating fertilizer pollution in the Mississippi River at $2.7 billion a year. The use of algae bioremediation in algae biosystems, could reduce that annual cost by a factor of at least 10. A wastewater bioremediation system uses algae raceways to allow algae to biosorb…

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 13

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 13

Bioremediation, nutrient recovery, serves as the critical first step in nutrient cycling. Most bioremediation research focuses on the capture of nutrients harmful to the environment, animals or people such as excess CO2, nitric oxides (NOx), polluted wastewater or toxic heavy metals…

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 12

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 12

Nutrient cycling provides the foundation for Ana’s quest to supply good food for hungry people. Nature wastes nothing by maintaining a closed nutrient loop. Each plant lives with nutrients passed down from organisms that lived earlier. When the plant or animal dies, it’s nutrients cycle…

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 11

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 11

The most critical contribution algae can make to MIA is to transform fossil agriculture, based on extracted resources, to abundant agriculture, based on biocycled resources. Fossil agriculture is not sustainable, because fossil resources are limited and becoming increasingly scarce…

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 10

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 10

Producing food grains to feed animals for meat requires 100 times more water than producing food for vegetarians. Meat production consumes 1,000 times more freshwater than using protein from algae. Algae do not require freshwater or arable land to grow, maximizing resources that…

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 9

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 9

Farmers have to make a full investment in their crop and pray that severe weather events, drought or pest invasions do not destroy it. A single storm, such as hurricane Harvey or Irma, a temperature spike or pest invasion can devastate crops. Modern Industrial Agriculture (MIA) ignores…

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 8

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 8

No, Ana cannot save modern industrial agriculture (MIA), from itself. MIA consumes far too many nonrenewable resources, uses them very inefficiently, and only once. The residuals leak to create massive waste streams that erode, degrade and pollute not only its own ecosystems…

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 7

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 7

Algae evolved in so many different competitive environments that the organisms built incredibly sophisticated defensive shields. Imagine each algae cell trying to survive and grow surrounded by a milieu of predators trying to eat it and trillions of bacteria, viruses, molds and other microorganisms…

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 6

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 6

Algae typically do not have to move, since the nutrients flow naturally in the water to them. Algae do not need rigid structures since they are supported by water. Amazingly, algae developed the ability to swim. Sometimes single-celled algae grow whip-like appendages called flagella, which coordinate …

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 5

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 5

Algae are aquatic microscopic plants with chlorophyll-a and a single-cell body not differentiated into roots, stems or leaves. Algae include some photosynthetic bacteria, the cyanobacteria. Algae’s photosynthetic mechanism is similar to land-based plants, except they are far more efficient in converting …

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 4

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 4

Tiny Mighty Al shares the story of how this 3.5-billion-year-old single-celled alga saved our planet not once, but twice. First, Al ate the predominately CO2 atmosphere and burped enough O2 to support life on earth. After supplying the oxygen, our planet lacked food. Al became the favored food…

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 3

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 3

Algae can be such lively little critters that some scientists consider them animals. Many can swim, such as dinoflagellates that have little whip-like structures called flagella which pull or push them through the water. Some algae squish part of their body forwards and crawl along solid surfaces…

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 2

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 2

Ana knows that tiny single-celled organisms have extraordinary properties. Her favorite, algae, is the mother of all land plants. Terrestrial plants, with roots, evolved from algae about 500 million years ago. Algae comes in all shapes and sizes from tiny to macro. Some algae species group and form…

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 1

Ana Feeds Our World, Part 1

By 2040, Ana’s world will have over 9 billion hungry people competing for nourishment on our increasingly hot, dry and crowded planet. What will Ana’s children do for food? To provide abundant affordable and sustainable food for everyone, we need a plant that works miracles…

Ana Feeds Our World — Introduction

Ana Feeds Our World — Introduction

Ana Feeds our World describes the adoption and diffusion of sustainable, healthy and affordable algae-based food for plants, animals and people. Ana identifies and celebrates the many miracles algae has contributed to our planet and our society. Does Ana suggest that algae alone will feed…

Dr. Mark Edwards, on food for future generations

Dr. Mark Edwards, on food for future generations

A frequent contributor to Algae Industry Magazine, Dr. Mark Edwards is widely considered the #1 author in the world on issues related to algae food, feed and bioproducts. His 14 books in the Green Algae Series, dozens of articles and over 130+ blog posts in Algae Industry Magazine…

A Green Friendship Bridge for Puerto Rico?

A Green Friendship Bridge for Puerto Rico?

The Green Friendship Bridge proposes to shift 1% of the cost for Trump’s proposed wall to build peace microfarms throughout Mexico and Central America. The Friendship Bridge will advance freedom, peace and prosperity rather than constructing an ugly and largely useless barrier. Puerto Rico needs…

Algae and Sex Part 6

Algae and Sex Part 6

An Algae Secrets series last year addressed the challenge of solving the problem of lead poisoning inflicted on children and adults in Flint Michigan. Flint Michigan regained new attention in September 2017 with a report by David Slusky and Daniel Grossman that fetal death rates rose by a horrifying 58% while the fertility…

Algae and Sex Part 5

Algae and Sex Part 5

Nutrient loss in foods may occur from rising levels of atmospheric CO2. Nutrient loss may come from degraded soil that has insufficient nutrients to support healthy crops. Cropland degrades from industrial agriculture’s standard operating procedure, systemic overproduction and constant…

Algae and Sex Part 4

Algae and Sex Part 4

The “sex self-destruction” theory posits that the collapse of vital dietary nutrients in food crops due to global warming contributes significantly to the catastrophic collapse in male sperm counts, which threatens to destroy successful sex. Prior posts examined the evidence indicating global warming will lead…

Algae and Sex Part 3

Algae and Sex Part 3

The “sex self-destruction” by inaction to climate change, nutrient collapse and sperm collapse is currently only a theory with strong indicators, but without sufficient proof of cause and effect. Sex self-destruction by continued overuse of pesticides is not a theory, it is fact. Here are the facts. EPA’s Annual use of Pesticides…

Algae and Sex Part 2

Algae and Sex Part 2

The sex self-destruction theory posits that nutrient collapse in food crops due to global warming contributes significantly to the catastrophic collapse in male sperm counts, which threatens to destroy successful sex. A recent study led by Samuel Myers and a team at the Harvard School of Public Health found that rising…

Algae and Sex Part 1: Self-Destruction

Algae and Sex Part 1: Self-Destruction

Sex self-destruction represents a fascinating new scientific mystery that includes climate chaos, ghost forests, temperature spikes, fierce storms, colossal nutrient collapse in field crops, prized stallions, knockout mice, virile mink and an end to sex as we know it. This avoidable self-destruction threatens humanity pain…

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