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Corbion’s plan after TerraVia acquisition

November 15, 2017
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Enzymes in Corbion’s bakery ingredients may be positively affected by Terra Via’s algae-based ingredients.

J dropcapeff Gelsky writes in Meat+Poultry that Corbion executives have given insights on how its September 29 acquisition of TerraVia Holdings Inc., an algae-based ingredients company, could benefit Corbion. Enzymes in Corbion’s bakery ingredients and antimicrobials in its meat ingredients are two promising areas. Amsterdam-based Corbion also hopes to bring down the costs of algae-based ingredients.

“Actually, what makes us unique by taking a company on like TerraVia is that our capability could produce large-scale fermentations at low cost,” said Tjerk de Ruiter, CEO of Corbion.

Costs of algae-based oil potentially could become more comparable to palm kernel oil, he said. “A palm kernel oil…the pricing varies from $900 to $1,500 a ton. This technology will not replace oil. This technology will replace specific fractions of palm kernel that are much higher valued.”

Marcel Wubbolts, Ph.D., chief technology officer for Corbion, also spoke about enzymes in bakery. “Enzymes are the catalysts of nature, and also in the portfolio of TerraVia. We are using enzymes as well, and we are engineering enzymes in algae to make our products fit better.”

Other Corbion ingredients work to inhibit bacteria in meat products, such as Listeria or Salmonella. “We have great competencies there, and we are now also very excited about adding some of the AlgaVia products because some of the algae oils are also known to have antimicrobial effects,” Dr. Wubbolts said.

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