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Algae Perspectives by Mary Rosenthal

CO2-consuming algae in the new Era of Regulation

June 25, 2013
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

ABOlogoToday’s announcement (June 25, 2013) by the Obama Administration on regulations to reduce the United States’ greenhouse gas emissions presents significant partnership opportunities for the U.S. algae industry with utilities and other regulated entities.

While many people think of CO2 emissions as a problem, algae technology companies see them as valuable inputs for the production of algae-based food, fuel and animal feed.  Algae consume CO2 as they grow, and for high productivity, algae require more CO2 which can be supplied by emission sources such as power plants. By reusing CO2, algae-based technologies provide carbon-intensive industries with an emissions reduction approach that is a revenue-generating opportunity, rather than a costly expense.

While reducing overall emissions, these technologies also reduce our reliance on imported oil and create new sources of food and feed on lands unsuitable for agriculture and using waters unsuitable for human consumption.

Members of the Algae Biomass Organization look forward to working with utilities and other affected entities to showcase algae-based solutions that can help them meet their obligations while creating jobs, reducing costs and creating new growth opportunities.

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