[ad#PhycoBiosciences AIM Interview]

Algae Perspectives by Mary Rosenthal

CO2-consuming algae in the new Era of Regulation

June 25, 2013
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

ABOlogoToday’s announcement (June 25, 2013) by the Obama Administration on regulations to reduce the United States’ greenhouse gas emissions presents significant partnership opportunities for the U.S. algae industry with utilities and other regulated entities.

While many people think of CO2 emissions as a problem, algae technology companies see them as valuable inputs for the production of algae-based food, fuel and animal feed.  Algae consume CO2 as they grow, and for high productivity, algae require more CO2 which can be supplied by emission sources such as power plants. By reusing CO2, algae-based technologies provide carbon-intensive industries with an emissions reduction approach that is a revenue-generating opportunity, rather than a costly expense.

While reducing overall emissions, these technologies also reduce our reliance on imported oil and create new sources of food and feed on lands unsuitable for agriculture and using waters unsuitable for human consumption.

Members of the Algae Biomass Organization look forward to working with utilities and other affected entities to showcase algae-based solutions that can help them meet their obligations while creating jobs, reducing costs and creating new growth opportunities.

HOME Algae Industry Jobs

Copyright ©2010-2013 AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com. All rights reserved. Permission required to reprint this article in its entirety. Must include copyright statement and live hyperlinks. Contact editorial@algaeindustrymagazine.com. A.I.M. accepts unsolicited manuscripts for consideration, and takes no responsibility for the validity of claims made in submitted editorial.

From The A.I.M. Archives

— Refresh Page for More Choices
U.S. farmers and biofuels makers are watching for the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) final decision on the 2014 Renewable Fuel Standard rules, which will set t...
Phys.org reports that, in collaboration with the Berlin, Germany LED manufacturer FutureLED, scientists at the Technische Universität München have developed a unique comb...
Caroline Scott-Thomas reports on Food Navigator about an online algae discussion on the social media site Reddit where Mars' chief agricultural officer Howard-Yana Shapir...
Kevin Valine at the Modesto Bee writes that the California city of Modesto may sell the algae that grows in its roughly 1,000 acres of sewer ponds at its Jennings Road wa...
The vision of developing a community college degree program to train a high technology algae workforce was launched at New Mexico's Santa Fe Community College (SFCC) in 2...
There are around 4500 dairy farms in Victoria, Australia, according to Business Victoria. Together they produced about 86 per cent of Australia’s dairy product exports, w...
Jessie Rack reports for NPR that demand for plant protein of all types is growing in concert with the growing interest in the U.S. to reduce meat consumption. People, fro...
Astaxanthin has been widely used in the aquaculture industry for pigmentation of salmon, trout and shrimp; used for its antioxidant and other health benefits in the nutra...
Researchers at Michigan State University have built a molecular super protein tool that streamlines the molecular machinery of cyanobacteria making, they say, biofuels an...
Modesto, California-based G3 Enterprises, Inc. has entered into an agreement with Commercial Algae Professionals (CAP) to represent their unique drying technology in the ...
While researchers have long suspected that climate change will lead to stronger and more frequent algal blooms, a new fusion of climate models and watershed models has pr...
Algae may hold the key to feeding the world’s burgeoning population. If algae’s efficiency at taking in carbon dioxide from the air could be transferred to crops, we coul...