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Technology

CleanGrow Multi-Ion Sensor

March 1, 2012
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

CleanGrow Model 2400 Multi-Ion Sensor

CleanGrow Model 2400 Multi-Ion Sensor

CleanGrow is offering a new class of hand-held multi-ion analyser that can simultaneously measure multiple ions (nutrients) in liquids, including Ca2+, K+, Na+, NO3-, NH4+, and Cl-. Using the same principles as a pH meter, this meter allows growers to consistently strike the right nutrient balance for optimum growth.

The real-time and fast measurement of these nutrients is ideal for nutrient management when growing algae, according to the manufacturer. The product combines a carbon nanotube-based sensor with a multiple-ion meter to simultaneously measure the concentrations. CleanGrow’s patented sensor technology is the first to use single-walled carbon nanotubes for ion-selective electrode (ISE) applications. Carbon nanotubes, says CleanGrow, have qualities that make them ideal for ion sensor applications.

The meter is currently being used at University of Wageningen, Dresden University of Applied Sciences, UC Davis (California) and at an increasing number of companies in the UK, USA, Asia and Europe. The probe requires virtually no maintenance and is all solid state.

real time ion

CleanGrow, an Irish technology company, launched the product recently at the Horti-Fair trade show in Holland and was the only non-Dutch company to get into the final ten for Product / Innovation of the Year, receiving fourth place overall.

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