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Chr. Hansen launches spirulina-based food colors

August 19, 2013
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Chr. Hansen offers a full range of natural colors from natural green and bright yellow to intense red and violet for confectionery.

Chr. Hansen offers a full range of natural colors from natural green and bright yellow to intense red and violet for confectionery.

Christian (Chr.) Hansen, a global bioscience company that produces natural ingredients for the food, health, pharmaceutical and agriculture industries, has launched a natural blue colorant made from the blue-green algae spirulina, for the confectionery and gum industry in the United States.

According to Kurt Seagrist, senior vice president, Natural Colors Division, Chr. Hansen U.S., spirulina provides bright vivid blue and green shades and it can be used in various types of confectionery, including panned candy and chewy candy, jelly gum/gummy candy, extruded candy and chewing gum.

The U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) has approved spirulina for use as colorant in confectionery and chewing gum in the U.S and the color is in full compliance with Federal Regulation. “Consumers have been long awaiting a natural blue and green for the confectionary industry. Spirulina provides a radiant blue and a foundation for natural green blends,” said Seagrist,

Chr. Hansen provides six liquid and powder product formulas, under the SweetColor product line for use in confectionery and gum. The products are claimed to be safeguarded for micro and bio issues and verified by third party certified auditors.

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