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Chlorella vs. Spirulina

July 29, 2017

Bob McCauley, a naturopathic doctor, Master Herbalist and a Certified Nutritional Consultant who sells chlorella and spirulina on his web blog, addresses a common question among his clientele: spirulina or chlorella — which is the way to go?

“The most powerful foods on earth are Spirulina Plantensis and Chlorella Pyrenoidosa. They complement one another in many ways because they are completely different foods with different nutrients. Spirulina is an extremely pure food, 95% digestible, extremely high in the Vitamin B-complex, iron, calcium and essential fatty acids such as Gamma Linolenic Acid (GLA), which is excellent for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis or bursitis. Spirulina is an excellent food to consume before a workout because of the explosive energy it provides to the body.

“Chlorella has incredible anti-cancer properties. Its unique fiber is great for the digestion (make sure the cell walls are broken) as well as heavy metal and synthetic toxin removal. It has large amounts of nucleic acids (RNA/DNA), which, along with amino acids (protein), are the building blocks of our cells. Chlorella can even be used topically on cuts, scrapes, infections, even serious wounds, as can Spirulina.

“Spirulina and Chlorella are perfect whole foods, true superfoods. They have perfect compliments of protein (60%) carbohydrates (19%), fats (6%) bio-available minerals (8%). They are not extracts, concentrates or amalgams of vitamins and minerals that look good on paper such as the vitamin and mineral supplements that people generally believe to be healthy. In reality, the body does not absorb 90% of these vitamin supplements because they are dead, void of enzymes. On the other hand, eating Spirulina or Chlorella is like eating any other whole food such as a banana, apple or broccoli.”

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