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Health & Nutrition

Chlorella touted as hangover cure

January 8, 2016
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Has this single-cell green algae has become the new superfood of the moment?

Has this single-cell green algae has become the new superfood of the moment?

Lisa Ryan writes for London’s Daily Mail that Chlorella has emerged as a superfood “hero,” full of essential vitamins, minerals and nutrients – known as a powerful liver and metal detoxifier that can knock out colds, flus and viruses, and even improve skin. Now, say experts, the single-cell green algae strain can also stop a hangover before it even starts.

Farmed mostly in Taiwan or Japan, Chlorella can easily be found online and in health food stores, available as both a supplement and a powder. For those who purchase the powdered version, mixing it with a smoothie or water with lemon is often recommended.

The algae are high in protein, as well as Vitamins A and B, iron, magnesium and zinc. As a result, Chlorella can help a person fight off environmental toxins, beat fatigue or ward off illness. The zinc and vitamins help prevent — or get rid of — colds, viruses and flu. But perhaps most impressive, it can block the harmful effects of alcohol by helping the body detox.

Chlorella has all the ingredients necessary to knock out a hangover. But, it will only work if taken at least two hours before a night of drinking. The algae work by protecting the liver before alcohol is consumed, acting in a preventative way.

Nikki Ostrower of NAO Nutrition in New York City says, “It floods your body with all of the nutrients that are robbed from it when you drink alcohol. If taken before a night out, the next day a person will notice their hangover is less intense than usual. Or, if a person is lucky, they may experience no hangover at all. Your vitamins and nutrients are replenished, so you might not feel nauseous or headachey, and you’ll also have less of a brain fog.”

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