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Cellana appoints Michael J. Kamdar as President

May 22, 2013
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

cellanaSan Diego, CA and Kailua-Kona, HI-based Cellana, Inc., has announced the appointment of Michael J. Kamdar as president of Cellana. Kamdar will be primarily responsible for commercialization, business development, research and development and operations.

“We are very pleased to have Michael join the Cellana team. His track record of success in building, funding and leading biotechnology and biopharmaceutical companies is very impressive,” said Martin Sabarsky, Cellana’s CEO. “Michael’s significant biopharmaceutical industry experience, including with both private and public companies, complements our existing team and will help accelerate our three-product business model into commercialization with a particular focus on the high-value portion in pharmaceutical and nutraceutical oils.”

“Cellana is entering an exciting growth stage as it begins to see its leading position in algae-based products advance into large-scale off-take agreements and commercialization,” said Kamdar. “I look forward to joining the Cellana team and helping the company achieve its goals of utilizing its one-of-a-kind technology to provide sustainable algae-based products for multiple industry sectors on a global basis.”

Kamdar has more than 25 years of fundraising, management, business development and commercial experience in the biotechnology, pharmaceutical and diagnostic industries. He has held executive positions at both public and private companies, including Agouron Pharmaceuticals, Warner-Lambert, Pfizer, Anadys Pharmaceuticals, VentiRx Pharmaceuticals and Genoa Pharmaceuticals, representing some of the most successful in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology communities.

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