[ad#PhycoBiosciences AIM Interview]

Research

Can algae help fight acne?

November 29, 2013
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Scotland’s University of Stirling

Scotland’s University of Stirling

Researchers from the University of Stirling, in Scotland, have been studying algae containing certain fatty acids with various cleansing qualities – some of which, their research now shows, can prevent the growth of Propionibacterium acnes, a bacterium that causes the common skin condition.

“The fatty acids inhibited the growth of the bacterium at concentrations similar to other acne treatments like benzoylperoxide and salicylic acid,” lead researcher Marine Biotechnology lecturer Dr. Andrew Desbois said. “Many fatty acids inhibit or kill bacteria and now some of these have been shown to prevent the growth of Propionibacterium acnes. Fatty acids are present naturally on our skin to defend us against unwanted bacteria so the application of additional fatty acids will augment our existing defenses.”

Desbois and his team identified six fatty acids including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), an omega-3 fatty acid already known to be important for human health and wellbeing, and dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (DGLA), an omega-6 fatty acid with anti-inflammatory properties. “Normally, we obtain these beneficial fatty acids through consuming fish or seaweed in our diets,” said Desbois. “However, we are planning to formulate the fatty acids into an ointment that can be applied to the skin to help people suffering with acne.”

The findings of this research are published in the journal Marine Drugs. Dublin-based drug discovery and development company Dignity Sciences commissioned the study and are currently at the trial stage to develop prescription medicines containing antibacterial fatty acids for treating acne and other skin diseases.

More Like This…

HOME Algae Industry Jobs

Copyright ©2010-2013 AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com. All rights reserved. Permission granted to reprint this article in its entirety. Must include copyright statement and live hyperlinks. Contact editorial@algaeindustrymagazine.com. A.I.M. accepts unsolicited manuscripts for consideration, and takes no responsibility for the validity of claims made in submitted editorial.

From The A.I.M. Archives

— Refresh Page for More Choices
In Australia, the New South Wales Deep Green Biotech Hub (DGBH) has been launched as an enabling incubator environment to foster the development of algae as a cost effect...
Cheryl Katz writes in National Geographic that Iceland’s last living lake balls are disappearing. The fluffy green supersize diatoms as large as a head of cabbage are one...
An unprecedented harmful algal bloom off the coast of New England this fall provided a unique opportunity for Waterville, Maine-based Colby College students studying at B...
Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft reports in Science Daily that two algae species survived 16 months on the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS) despite extreme temper...
The University of Kentucky (UK) Center for Applied Energy Research’s (CAER) Biofuels and Environmental Catalysis Group has received a $1.2 million U.S. Department of Ener...
Sarah Karacs reports for @CNNTech that Japanese firm Euglena has been cultivating a type of algae for use in food and cosmetics. But it sees a range of other potential us...
Qualitas Health, an algae-based health and nutrition company headquartered in Texas, has announced a long term, strategic partnership with commercial crop producer Green ...
WesTech Engineering, Inc. and Utah State University’s Sustainable Waste-to-Bioproducts Engineering Center (SWBEC) are jointly engaged in developing processes for more eff...
The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has announced the selection of three projects to receive up to $8 million, aimed at reducing the costs of producing algal biofuels and...
The recent announcement by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) of three projects to receive up to $8 million, aimed at reducing the costs of producing algal biofuels and ...
Memory Maninga reports for Zambia Daily Mail that in Mansa, the capital of the Luapula Province of Zambia, spirulina is being grown in ponds in the communities because of...
The United States Department of Energy (DOE) announced that the University of New England was awarded a three-year, nationally competitive research grant for $1,321,039 f...