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Building a solar farm on the Tijuana River

March 29, 2016
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Architect Rene Peralta, standing above the Tijuana River, is proposing a solar farm and green algae cleaning system for the channelized river. Photo: Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times

Architect Rene Peralta, standing above the Tijuana River, is proposing a solar farm and green algae cleaning system for the channelized river. Photo: Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times

Carolina A. Miranda writes in the LA Times that Los Angeles has been examining the role its river can play in the city’s greater ecology. Even architect Frank Gehry is involved in a makeover for the L.A. River.

In Tijuana, Mexico, however, another architect is devising a plan to turn the Tijuana River channel into a solar farm that could provide power to as many as 30,000 homes. LA officials are keeping an eye on that project to see if it is something for them to consider as well.

Rene Peralta, co-founder of the Tijuana firm Generica and director of an architecture master’s program at San Diego’s Woodbury University, thinks that his city can transform this unwieldy piece of infrastructure into a renewable energy plant and water-cleaning station.

“This is the first thing you see when you enter the country from the United States,” says Mr. Peralta, standing on a bridge over the river on a sunny January morning. “And sometimes it’s the first thing that you smell.” On a warm day, the river can take on the aroma of hard-boiled eggs past their prime.

So the architect teamed with urban planner Jim Bliesner of the Center for Urban Economics and Design at UC San Diego to developed the solar farm proposal that would involve straddling panels over the arroyo for the river’s nearly 11-mile course.

The proposal also includes plans for an algae farm that would help filter contaminants out of river water so that it might be repurposed. The resulting algae could then be employed to create biofuels.

A view of what the Tijuana River might look like with a solar farm straddling its width. Part of the plan would also involve using algae to clean the water and produce energy. Photo: Generica

A view of what the Tijuana River might look like with a solar farm straddling its width. Part of the plan would also involve using algae to clean the water and produce energy. Photo: Generica

“There are 15 million gallons of water per day that flow through there,” Mr. Peralta says. “It’s treated, but you can’t drink it. But with one more layer of polish, we could recycle the water for industrial purposes.”

Dominick Mendola, a senior development engineer at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, has been involved with the project as an advisor. A scientist who has practical experience working in aquaculture and algae, Dr. Mendola says the Tijuana River is perfectly positioned to support an algae farm.

“You’re at about 32 degrees north latitude and it’s facing the sun all day long,” he says. “The river runs from east to west, so its northern wall is facing south, exactly where the sun is running. You could turn that site into an energy producing factory.”

The North American Development Bank has shown interest in providing development funding once the planners are able to line up collaborators from the government and commercial sectors – to show that the project could be viable at both an economic and political level. Mr. Peralta says that will likely come after Tijuana’s mayoral elections in June.

Dr. Mendola, in the meantime, says a project of this nature would have far-reaching effects on the U.S. side of the border too – especially in the world of research and education. “It could seed the idea of renewable energy,” he says. “I work for a university. The idea of having a green classroom of green algal walls turning waste into fuel so close by? That would be powerful.”

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