Click here for more information about Algenuity
Click here for more information about Liqofluxphenometrics515R1
Visit cricatalyst.com!Evodos Separation Technology

Innovations

A boat to revolutionize seaweed cultivation

July 7, 2017
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Researchers are designing the world’s largest seaweed cultivation vessel. Photo: SINTEF.

Ship-technology.com reports that researchers and industry in Norway are designing the world’s largest seaweed cultivation vessel to meet growing demand for the multi-functional algae.

Global seaweed production more than doubled between 2000 and 2014 to around 28 million tons annually, worth an estimated $6 billion. In Norway, which is home to 400 species, demand has begun to outstrip capacity, where much of the sowing and harvesting from cultivation farms is still carried out manually. This is unsustainable; commercial production turnover is already $140 million ­– and is predicted to increase to $4.8 billion by 2050.

Charged with finding a solution is a multidisciplinary research team headed by the largest independent research organization in Scandinavia, SINTEF Ocean, and Møre Maritime AS, a Norwegian ship design company specializing in aquaculture vessels.

Funded $2 million by industry and the Research Council of Norway, the consortium is designing a new vessel specifically equipped for commercial seaweed cultivation and production.

“Most seaweed handling is done manually and/or with help from equipment from other applications that is not adapted to the purpose, resulting in time-consuming operations,” says Andreas Myskja Lien, a research scientist at SINTEF. “This is a challenge cultivators are facing, considering ambitions for expansion and industrialization.”

The vessel is still in the design stage, but a key requirement is that it be equipped for the gamut of operations, from the installation of seaweed cultivation facilities, to the transport and sowing of seaweed seedlings and the preservation of the fully-grown plants during harvesting and transport.

“Using the seaweed for food requires careful handling and preservation of not only the nutrient compounds, but also the aesthetics of the plants, transporting in a controlled environment,” said Dr. Lien. “The on-board systems of the vessel are dependent on the end product. For example, using it for alginate extraction it might be shredded and silaged straight away. Several solutions will be investigated, and the project might result in several specialized concepts.”

Read More

More Like This…

HOME A.I.M. Archives

Copyright ©2010-2017 AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com. All rights reserved. Permission required to reprint this article in its entirety. Must include copyright statement and live hyperlinks. Contact editorial@algaeindustrymagazine.com. A.I.M. accepts unsolicited manuscripts for consideration, and takes no responsibility for the validity of claims made in submitted editorial.

twittertopbarlinks_eventstopbarlinks_requesttopbarlinks_archives

From The A.I.M. Archives

— Refresh Page for More Choices
Northwestern University researchers have developed a quantitative tool that might help bring back coral from the brink of extinction. The novel algorithm could help asses...
In New Zealand is an internationally significant collection of microalgae cultures known as the Cawthron Institute Culture Collection of Microalgae (CICCM). The CICCM was...
Tafline Laylin writes for Inhabitat.com about the elegant solution that Romanian designer Alexandru Predonu has conceived that uses solar energy to power a rotating desal...
Cheryl Katz writes in National Geographic that Iceland’s last living lake balls are disappearing. The fluffy green supersize diatoms as large as a head of cabbage are one...
Global Algae Innovations, with headquarters in San Diego, California, and cultivation/production facilities in Lihue, Hawaii, have introduced a new algae harvesting syste...
Cellana, Inc., a leading developer of algae-based products for sustainable nutrition and energy applications, and PIVEG, Inc., a leader in high-specification ingredients ...
In one of the most comprehensive studies to date, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researchers have sequenced the genes of a harmful algal bloom, unveiling nev...
The Energy Department (DOE) has announced the selection of six projects for up to $12.9 million in federal funding, entitled, “Project Definition for Pilot- and Demonstra...
A Quebec-based company that specializes in the manufacturing and commercialization of marine and seaweed-based products for agriculture and horticulture constructed a new...
Almost two years ago, on June 28, 2015, the rocket carrying experiments from Chatfield High School to the International Space Station disintegrated 139 seconds into its f...
WesTech Engineering, Inc. and Utah State University’s Sustainable Waste-to-Bioproducts Engineering Center (SWBEC) are jointly engaged in developing processes for more eff...
Memory Maninga reports for Zambia Daily Mail that in Mansa, the capital of the Luapula Province of Zambia, spirulina is being grown in ponds in the communities because of...