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BioProcess Algae gets $6.4 million from DOE for biorefinery

April 22, 2013
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Algae cultivation at BioProcess Algae, in Shenandoah, Iowa

Algae cultivation at BioProcess Algae, in Shenandoah, Iowa

BioProcess Algae, of Shenandoah, Iowa, will be receiving up to $6.4 million from the U.S. Energy Department to evaluate an innovative algal growth platform that will produce hydrocarbon fuels meeting military specifications using renewable carbon dioxide, lignocellulosic sugars, and waste heat. The proposed biorefinery will integrate low-cost autotrophic algal production, accelerated lipid production, and lipid conversion. While the primary product from the proposed biorefinery will be military fuels, the facility will also co-produce additional products, including other hydrocarbons, glycerine, and animal feed.

The project is a part of the newly announced award of nearly $18 million to fund four innovative pilot-scale biorefineries in California, Iowa, and Washington that will test renewable biofuels as a domestic alternative to power cars, trucks, and planes that meet military specifications for jet fuel and shipboard diesel.

“Advanced biofuels are an important part of President Obama’s all-of-the-above strategy to reduce America’s dependence on foreign oil, improve our energy security, and protect our air and water,” said Energy Secretary Steven Chu. “The innovative biorefinery projects announced today mark an important step toward producing fuels for our American military and the civil aviation industry from renewable resources found right here in the United States.”

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