Biomedical benefits of macroalgae study in Chile

June 12, 2013
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Ahnfeltia plicata, the landlady's wig, is a species of red alga.

Ahnfeltia plicata, the landlady’s wig, is a species of red alga. Courtesy: Gabriele Kothe-Heinrich, Wikipedia.org

Analia Murias reports in Chile’s fis.com that researchers at the University of Santiago de Chile (USACH) are studying three species of macroalgae: Mazzaella laminarioides, Sarcothalia crispata and Ahnfeltia plicata – in the Region of Magallanes – to develop antibacterial patches and gastric juice resistant drugs.

The study, entitled Soluble Algal Polysaccharides from the Magallanes Region, is a project funded by Chile’s Department of Scientific and Technological Research (Dicyt) of the Vice-Rectory for Research, Development and Innovation, and is directed by Betty Matsuhiro, a researcher at the Department of Environmental Sciences of the Faculty of Chemistry and Biology of USACH.

Algal polysaccharides are used primarily in the food industry. “With this new project, the idea is to innovate in the use of this natural resource and develop products with higher added value, which can be used in biomedicine,” said Matsuhiro.

During the first stage of the study, researchers at the University of Magallanes, and at the Institute of Ecology and Biodiversity, will be in charge of collecting algae. Later, the polysaccharide extraction, their chemical modification and conjugation with synthetic polymers will be developed.

At a later stage the encapsulation of drugs will be analyzed, according to USACH. An application of the polysaccharides under study is their use to encapsulate drugs and prevent them from disintegrating with the acidity of gastric juices. Since they are biodegradable and biocompatible, polysaccharides are helpful for use with antibacterial drugs.

Read More

More Buzz…

HOME Algae Industry Jobs

Copyright ©2010-2013 AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com. All rights reserved. Permission required to reprint this article in its entirety. Must include copyright statement and live hyperlinks. Contact editorial@algaeindustrymagazine.com. A.I.M. accepts unsolicited manuscripts for consideration, and takes no responsibility for the validity of claims made in submitted editorial.

From The A.I.M. Archives

— Refresh Page for More Choices
Don Willmott writes in Huffington Post about Nevada-based Algae Systems, which has built a test plant on Alabama's Mobile Bay to not only turn algae into diesel fuel but ...
James Goodman writes in the democratandchronicle.com about Jeffrey Lodge, an associate professor of biological sciences at Rochester Institute of Technology, who knows wh...
As of March 1, 2015, bbi-biotech GmbH, of Berlin, Germany, has begun integrating IGV Biotech GmbH’s photobioreactors into its own life science product portfolio. A former...
K. S. Rajgopal writes in thehindu.com about a new study that demonstrates how macroalgal biomass from Gelidiella acerosa and Gracilaria dura collected from Adri and Verav...
In one of the first studies to examine the potential for using municipal wastewater as a feedstock for algae-based biofuels, Rice University scientists found they could e...
Simris Alg, a pioneering agribusiness producing omega-3 from farmed algae, has been declared one of Sweden’s 33 hottest companies in new technology. The renowned list is ...
Murdoch University researchers are investigating whether the effluent from piggeries can be effectively treated with micro- and macroalgae so that species of the organism...
Tubular glass photobioreactor (PBR) systems protect algae from harmful environmental factors, keeping strains safer from bio-contamination. The glass tubing itself can be...
The vision of developing a community college degree program to train a high technology algae workforce was launched at New Mexico's Santa Fe Community College (SFCC) in 2...
The fully automated plant at the Fraunhofer Center for Chemical-Biotechnological Processes CBP in Leuna, Germany, was designed to produce microalgae at industrial scale. ...
Tom Redmond and Yuko Takeo report for Bloomberg.com that, after 10 years of developing algae as a nutritional supplement generating $37.8 million in annual revenue, Japan...
Studies conducted by EnAlgae partners in Ireland, France and Belgium point the way to seaweed being a viable and sustainable feedstock for the future in North West Europe...
Scientists have been investigating the likely future impact of changing environmental conditions on ocean phytoplankton, which forms the basis of all the oceans' food cha...
Currently made most often from petroleum and natural gas, ethylene is used in the manufacture of plastics and polyester, and ranks as the largest petrochemical produced b...
Nitrogen and phosphate nutrients are among the biggest costs in cultivating algae for biofuels. Sandia National Laboratories molecular biologists Todd Lane and Ryan Davis...