twittertopbarlinks_eventstopbarlinks_requesttopbarlinks_archives
NCMA Algae Tips
Click here for more information about Liqofluxphenometrics515R1
Visit cricatalyst.com!Commercial Algae Professionals

Process

Bangladesh looking for algae developers

February 2, 2016 — by M. Asraful Alam, PhD
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

To combat the national food and energy challenge, Bangladesh needs to focus on alternative sources of energy, says a microalgae biotechnologist.

To combat the national food and energy challenge, Bangladesh needs to focus on alternative sources of energy, says a microalgae biotechnologist.

Bangladesh will have 200 million inhabitants by 2050, which will lead to national challenges in terms of food and energy supply, as well as overall sustainability.

Bangladesh has been ranked a lower-middle income country for its improved economic performance in the past year according to the World Bank. The rate of economic growth will lead to attaining the status of a higher-middle income nation within the next couple of years. Hence, food and energy need to be not only sustained but also greatly enhanced for uplifting the population and economy.

According to the Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics (BBS), the country has achieved near self-sufficiency in food grain production but is far behind in energy production and supply. Think-tank economists postulate that, because of population and income growth, the demand for energy is expected to rise by over 1.3% per annum for the next few decades. Records of energy import data for the last decades imply that, on average, Bangladesh imports about 3.9 million tons of petrochemicals yearly, of which diesel accounts for 2.3 million tons and costs around USD $570 million.

Policy makers and researchers in Bangladesh as well as many other countries have been looking for alternatives to fossil oil, and bio-fuel is one of the promising options. For several years, microalgae has been mentioned as a promising candidate for the sustainable production of feed, fuels and chemicals.

In the case of Bangladesh, no updated data is available, as we do not have a national microalgae collection and culture center. However nearly 200 marine algal taxa (seaweeds) have been reported so far by Bangladeshi researchers. The government needs to setup a microalgae collection and culture center to collect the strains and preserve the utilization right of the country.

For this ambitious effort to be meaningful beyond the scientific community, significant investments will have to be arranged in measuring algae performance under a specific range of conditions. As we have a limitation of experts and funds, we should make international collaborations to accomplish the projects.

Genomes of 186 Bangladeshi rice varieties have been sequenced in the Beijing Genomics Institute, in China, as part of a global collaborative project in recent years, opening up new opportunities for varietal rice developments. We can do the same for microalgae.

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, along with the Chinese Ministry of Science and Technology, jointly funded the sequencing and the initial analysis for the Bangladesh Rice Research Institute (BRRI). Similar projects for microalgae collections, culture, and research will give us a green economy and it can be considered the green gold of Bangladesh.

Strategies for proper management and utilization of fresh and marine water resources need to be finalized and organizations or individuals need to be encouraged to increase investment. The government can take incentives to welcome Bangladeshi researchers across the world and give them partial or full attachments in various research institutes, universities and industries to engage their knowledge for the country.

The amount of sunlight we get is sufficient for microalgae production. Records from the Ministry of Agricultural data show that we have 0.73 million hectares of land that are not suitable for any crop production and can be used for algae production. The water required for microalgae can be used from any source, even the wastewater from our industrial or domestic use. The wastewater already contains nitrogen or phosphate for algae nutrient, thus this can minimize the production cost as well as mitigate the environment pollution.

Producing one ton of algae biomass requires 1.83 ton of CO2. Microalgae culture systems can be incorporated with power plant flue gas for commercial production, which will reduce air pollution while minimizing the cost of the algae production.

To combat the national food and energy challenge, we need to focus on alternative sources of energy. Microalgae is one of the strong candidates. Multilateral co-operation is needed among the government, stakeholders, researchers and individuals to make it happen.

Read More

The writer is a microalgae biotechnologist and renewable bioenergy researcher, currently affiliated with Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Chinese Academy of Science, China. He can be reached at alam@ms.giec.ac.cn.

More Like This…

HOME A.I.M. Archives

Copyright ©2010-2016 AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com. All rights reserved. Permission required to reprint this article in its entirety. Must include copyright statement and live hyperlinks. Contact editorial@algaeindustrymagazine.com. A.I.M. accepts unsolicited manuscripts for consideration, and takes no responsibility for the validity of claims made in submitted editorial.

From The A.I.M. Archives

— Refresh Page for More Choices
Fort Myers, FL-based Algenol, and India's Reliance Industries Ltd., have deployed India’s first Algenol algae production platform. The demonstration module is located nea...
Sebastian Rich reports on PBS Newshour about the Central African Republic city of Bangui, which has been caught in the crossfire between warring Muslim and Christian grou...
UC San Diego’s efforts to produce innovative and sustainable solutions to the world’s environmental problems have resulted in a partnership with the region’s surfing indu...
John O’Renick, in this insightful piece from the Portland (Oregon) Tribune, writes about the problems we create from treating waste streams as garbage to be disposed of i...
OriginClear Inc. and partner AlgEternal have announced that, based on AlgEternal’s field tests, they believe their pure algae concentrate, harvested with OriginClear tech...
Nurit Canetti writes in Israeli Pulse that Rwandan agronomists are on a one-year visit to Israel to study various aspects of Israeli agriculture firsthand. Primarily they...
Researchers at Michigan State University have built a molecular super protein tool that streamlines the molecular machinery of cyanobacteria making, they say, biofuels an...
A new $1 million relationship between Michigan State University and ExxonMobil will expand research in the fundamental science to advance algae-based fuels. Dr. David Kra...
Hannah Osborne writes in the International Business Times that algae has been genetically engineered to kill cancer cells without harming healthy cells. The algae nanopar...
The last post positioned algae solutions for bioremediation of poisoned water and soil that can reduce the risk of arsenic exposure and the onset of autism spectrum disor...
An enzyme responsible for making hydrocarbons has been discovered by Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientists studying the common green microalga Botryococcus braunii. ...
The GNT Group, a market leader in using algae as natural ingredients for color, has begun construction of an additional spirulina plant at its headquarters in Mierlo, the...