[ad#The Buzz Sponsor Ad]

Australia could become algae oil exporter

July 26, 2013
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Manager of the University's Biofuels Research Centre, Dr. Evan Stephens. Photo: Gisela Jakob

Manager of the University’s Biofuels Research Centre, Dr. Evan Stephens. Photo: Gisela Jakob

Australia could potentially produce five times more oil than they currently consume and become an oil exporter by devoting just one percent of their land to algae farms, according to news out of Australia’s University of Queensland (UQ).

Dr. Evan Stephens and his team at UQ’s Institute for Molecular Bioscience, in collaboration with Germany’s Bielefeld University and Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, have identified fast-growing and hardy native algae species that are providing optimism for the development of commercially viable fuels from algae.

“A major new frontier is in the biology and developing new strains – and we’ve already made significant advances through the identification of high-efficiency strains that have really stable growth, as well as being resistant to predators and temperature fluctuations,” said Dr. Stephens, the UQ Solar Biofuels Research Centre manager.

The research team has identified hundreds of native species of microscopic algae from freshwater and saltwater environments around Australia, and has tested these against thousands of environmental conditions in the laboratory, creating a shortlist of top performers. “Previously the main focus has been looking for oil-rich algae, but usually these are tastier to predators – like microscopic scoops of ice cream,” Dr. Stephens said. “The integration of new technologies means we can turn a broad range of algae into bio-crude oil that can be processed in existing oil refineries, so now the success of the industry comes down to rapid growth and low production costs.”

The researchers are processing the algae at a pilot plant opened in Brisbane in April, fueled by investment from Finland’s Neste Oil, global engineering company KBR, Siemens, the Queensland Government and Cement Australia.

Read More

 

More Buzz…

HOME Algae Industry Jobs

Copyright ©2010-2013 AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com. All rights reserved. Permission required to reprint this article in its entirety. Must include copyright statement and live hyperlinks. Contact editorial@algaeindustrymagazine.com. A.I.M. accepts unsolicited manuscripts for consideration, and takes no responsibility for the validity of claims made in submitted editorial.

From The A.I.M. Archives

— Refresh Page for More Choices
Global Algae Innovations, with headquarters in San Diego, California, and cultivation/production facilities in Lihue, Hawaii, have introduced a new algae harvesting syste...
Portuguese microalgae producer, Allmicroalgae Natural Products S.A., has moved to the next stage in development of new production technologies to grow Nannochloropsis oce...
Nicolas Sainte-Foie writes for Labiotech.eu about French startup Algopack manufacturing bio-based plastics made from brown algae. Founded by Rémy Lucas in 2010 and manage...
Joy Lanzendorfer reports for NPR that, as seaweed continues to gain popularity for its nutritional benefits and culinary versatility, more people are taking up seaweed fo...
For algal biofuels to compete with petroleum, farming algae has to become less expensive. Toward that goal, Sandia National Laboratories is testing strains of algae for r...
Sarah Karacs reports for @CNNTech that Japanese firm Euglena has been cultivating a type of algae for use in food and cosmetics. But it sees a range of other potential us...