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Artificial cartilage grown using alginate

July 27, 2016
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Penn State University associate professor of engineering science and mechanics, Ibrahim T. Ozbolat, is using alginate and 3D printing to create artificial cartilage that can be used to replace worn out tissue.

Penn State University associate professor of engineering science and mechanics, Ibrahim T. Ozbolat, is using alginate and 3D printing to create artificial cartilage that can be used to replace worn out tissue.

Labnews.co.uk writes about a team of engineers using a 3D printer and bioink — a material made from living cells — to produce artificial cartilage. It is suitable for large-scale bioprinting, as it is unicellular and contains no blood vessels. The artificial cartilage produced is very similar to cow cartilage.

“Our goal is to create tissue that can be used to replace large amounts of worn out tissue or design patches. Those who have osteoarthritis in their joints suffer a lot. We need a new alternative treatment for this,” said lead researcher, Ibrahim T. Ozbolat, associate professor of engineering science and mechanics at Penn State University.

Previous attempts to grow cartilage began with cells that were embedded in a hydrogel. Composed of polymer chains and about 90% water, it was used as a scaffold to grow tissue. However, the cells grown in the gel were found to not possess sufficient mechanical integrity.

Instead, researchers created tiny tubes between three and five one-hundredths of an inch in diameter made of alginate. Cartilage cells were injected into the tube and grown for a week. As the cells do not stick to the alginate, they could be easily removed from the tubes.

The cartilage strands were substituted for ink in a 3D printer. A specially designed prototype nozzle was attached to the 3D printer, allowing for rows of cartilage strands to be printed according to the researchers’ wishes. After 30 minutes, the cells had self-adhered enough to be moved to a petri dish containing nutrient media, where they eventually fused together.

Dr. Ozbolat said that as no scaffolding is used, the printing process is scalable so the patches can be made bigger. He added: “We can mimic real articular cartilage by printing strands vertically and then horizontally to mimic the natural architecture.”

The study was published in Scientific Reports.

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