Click here for more information about Algenuity
Click here for more information about Liqofluxphenometrics515R1
Visit cricatalyst.com!Evodos Separation Technology

Research

Arctic phytoplankton are more resistant to climate change

May 9, 2018
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Arctic phytoplankton
Image: http://oceanicdefense.blogspot.com

Ocean acidification triggered by climate change seems to cause less harm to the Arctic phytoplankton, which is resistant to the changes in climate that affect the Arctic Ocean’s coastal waters, as reported in a study released by Canadian researchers and the German Alfred Wegener Institute in the journal Nature Climate Change.

This resilience could be caused by the fact that the phytoplankton in this area is accustomed to harsh and unpredictable climatic conditions.

In winter, the microalgae in this area live in complete darkness and in summer are continuously exposed to light. In addition, they are sometimes found in clear, salt water, while sometimes in turbid freshwater in rivers.

For the team of Clara Hoppe of the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research (AWI), such natural circumstances made the Arctic phytoplankton more adaptable. The same is true for their productivity and the development of microalgae populations.

Researchers conducted trials on natural microalgae populations, exposing them to various temperatures, light levels, and water of different levels of acidification. They observed that they are more adaptable to change than their counterparts for other oceans.

The elevated level of CO2 in the atmosphere results in a higher concentration of CO2 in the water. At this point, CO2 from the water binds with the carbonic acid and improves the water’s acidification process. The acidification is more pronounced in the Arctic in comparison to the more stable environmental conditions found in other oceans of the world.

Other impacts of climate change are sea temperature increase and the change in light intensity caused by lower sea levels.

Microalgae provide an invaluable resource for whales, seals and other marine species that live in the Arctic Ocean, therefore, the fact that the Arctic phytoplankton is resistant to climate change is definitely beneficial.

Read More

More Like This…

Copyright ©2010-2019 AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com. All rights reserved. Permission required to reprint this article in its entirety. Must include copyright statement and live hyperlinks. Contact editorial@algaeindustrymagazine.com. A.I.M. accepts unsolicited manuscripts for consideration, and takes no responsibility for the validity of claims made in submitted editorial.

twittertopbarlinks_eventstopbarlinks_requesttopbarlinks_archives

From The A.I.M. Archives

— Refresh Page for More Choices
Trade Arabia reports that the Oman Centre for Marine Biotechnology (OCMB) recently signed a memorandum of understanding with Swedish Algae Factory to support the domestic...
Israeli-based Algatechnologies, Ltd. (Algatech) has become the major shareholder in Supreme Health New Zealand, Ltd. (Supreme) to supply the rapidly growing markets in Ch...
At the Technical University of Denmark (DTU), Science Nordic.com reports, researchers are investigating bioluminescent algae, to determine whether bioluminescent organism...
Hayley Dunning writes from the Imperial College of London that a new discovery has changed our understanding of the basic mechanism of photosynthesis and should rewrite t...
Judith Lewis Mernit writes in e360.yale.edu that an experiment being conducted by animal science professor Ermias Kebreab at the University of California, Davis, is testi...
Amy Thompson writes in Space.com that SpaceX successfully launched its 15th Space Station cargo-resupply mission on Friday, June 29; carrying a payload of experiments des...
Algae and corals have been leaning on each other since dinosaurs roamed the earth, much longer than had been previously thought, according to new research led by scientis...
Cécile Barbière writes for Euractive.fr (translated by Rob Kirby) that, in large greenhouses formerly home to the tomatoes and cucumbers of the market gardening Groupe Ol...
The Swiss Algae Consortium Association (SWALG) was founded in May 2018 as a non-profit organization that serves as a platform for algae-related activities in Switzerland ...
Nature.com reports that swimming algae have been enlisted to carry drugs to individual cells, raising the prospect that such “microswimmers” could deliver targeted therap...
Mazda U.K. has announced that they are currently involved in joint research projects and studies as part of an ongoing industry-academia-government collaboration to promo...
London-based architectural and urban design firm ecoLogicStudio www.ecologicstudio.com, led by Claudia Pasquero and Marco Poletto, has unveiled Photo.Synth.Etica, a large...