Aquaflow Wins Red Herring Top 100 Asia Award

October 2, 2012
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Nelson, New Zealand–based Kiwi renewable fuels company Aquaflow Bionomic Corporation has been awarded a Red Herring magazine Top 100 Asia Award. The prestigious award honors the year’s most promising private technology ventures from the Asian business region. The company was selected from around 200 finalists in a range of technology sectors.

Over the last six years Aquaflow has developed a commercial offering that enables it to take multi-biomass feed stocks (for example trees, algae and agricultural waste) and process it into renewable hydrocarbon fuels. Aquaflow announced in April that it had successfully entered a technology co-operation agreement with CRI Catalyst Company (CRI), and since that time has started planning to establish its first series of commercial scale refineries in a number of locations.

“This award is very exciting for us and a great endorsement for our renewable hydrocarbons technology. We went through a tough assessment process and the judges were looking for companies who are about to make a global impact. This award will open some important doors for us. The Red Herring community is very influential and knowledgeable,” said Aquaflow director Nick Gerritsen.

The Red Herring editorial team selected the most innovative companies from a pool of hundreds from across Asia. The nominees were evaluated on both quantitative and qualitative criteria, such as financial performance, technology innovation, quality of management, execution of strategy, and integration into their respective industries.

The finalists were invited to present their winning strategies at the Red Herring Asia Forum in Hong Kong, September 10-12, 2012. The Top 100 winners were announced at a special awards ceremony on the evening of September 12 at the event.

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