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Innovations

Alltech Symposium showcases algae foods and feeds

May 23, 2013
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Speaking to more than 2,300 delegates from 72 countries, Rebecca Timmons¸ global director of applications research and quality for Alltech, kicked off the closing session of Alltech’s recent International Symposium, highlighting the latest applications for algae in livestock and human nutrition.



Speaking to more than 2,300 delegates from 72 countries, Rebecca Timmons¸ global director of applications research and quality for Alltech, kicked off the closing session of Alltech’s recent International Symposium, highlighting the latest applications for algae in livestock and human nutrition.

Alltech, the Louisville, Kentucky-based animal feed giant, attracted more than 2,300 people from 72 countries to their mid-May Symposium to get a glimpse of the farmers and ranchers’ world of the future. “We can really change the way we feed the world…but feeding them in a better way,” said Rebecca Timmons¸ global director of applications research and quality for Alltech.

Athough microalgae contain large quantities of high quality eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) that can bring additional nutritional improvements to feeds and food, Timmons says these products can often be inconsistent, unsustainable, unavailable, of poor quality and unsafe.

At Alltech’s algae production facility in Winchester, Kentucky, Alltech SP-1 was recently developed to provide a consistent source of algae with a wide range of benefits for a variety of livestock species, as well as improvements for both ends of the value chain.

Besides seeing an increase in immunity, a decrease in mortality and increased litter size in their herds, producers who employ feeds with this type of algae will be able to further brand their products as value-added DHA Omega-3 enriched for consumers.

The message Timmons sent to the influential group of food and feed decision makers was two-fold: “You’re going to have those benefits to the animals, as well as through the enriched product to consumers. This means you will be improving your return while creating a healthier population of both humans and animals all at the same time.”

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