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Aliga developing high volumes of microalgae for aquafeed

September 13, 2017
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Microalgae. Credit: Aliga.dk

Neil Ramsden reports in UndercurrentNews.com that young Danish firm Aliga is seeking cooperation with major fish feed players to use its microalgae-derived products in aquafeed formulations. Speaking at the recent AquaNor show in Trondheim, Norway, Aliga sales director David Erlandsson said talks with the major players in the fish feed industry were ongoing.

“One big problem for feed manufacturers, when it comes to microalgae-derived ingredients, is finding a steady and reliable supply of sufficient volumes,” he said. “With our technology, we believe we can provide those volumes, as we have a continuous production of high quality biomass, which we harvest daily.”

The north Denmark-based company — now one year old as a commercial enterprise — can grow a variety of different strains of microalgae, allowing for the production of biomass rich in EPA [eicosapentaenoic acid] and DHA [docosahexaenoic acid] omega-3 oils, proteins, vitamins and other nutrients.

At present Aliga sells its products to hatcheries as zooplankton feed and green-water techniques (one method of raising farmed fish in water with algae) for finfish like seabass and bream, as well as for shrimp and mussels.

But the company is also looking to court feed manufacturers seeking to expand their portfolios with fish-free feeds, where microalgae components are important ingredients, said Mr. Erlandsson.

To explore potential opportunities with these fish-free components, Aliga has partnered with the Danish Technology Institute and the Technical University of Denmark, and would welcome any other university cooperation, he added.

The private equity backing is in this project for the long-haul, said Mr. Erlandsson. “They are focused on sustainable innovation. We see great potential for algae-derived omega-3 for the human consumption market as well, but our first priority is aquafeed.”

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