twittertopbarlinks_eventstopbarlinks_requesttopbarlinks_archives
Click here for more information about Liqofluxphenometrics515R1
Visit cricatalyst.com!Evodos Separation Technology

Research

Algal blooms — finding the culprit

August 4, 2016
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Actual toxic algae cells from St. Lucie River algae disaster in Florida

Actual toxic algae cells from St. Lucie River algae disaster in Florida, July, 2016, as imaged on FlowCam Cyano instrumentation.

The water sample taken from the St. Lucie River near the coastline of Ft. Pierce, Florida was loaded with blue-green algae when it arrived in Ben Spaulding’s lab in Scarborough, Maine. As laboratory manager for Fluid Imaging Technologies, Mr. Spaulding ran the thick, green sample through the company’s FlowCam Cyano to determine the types of algae that have devastated the Florida coastline and triggered a state of emergency.

The FlowCam Cyano automatically detects, images and identifies thousands of individual algal cells in a sample in minutes and differentiates the toxic cyanobacteria from the harmless algal cells. Proprietary software allows further characterization using 30 different parameters involving size, shape and color.

While the St. Lucie River water may ordinarily include dozens of different species of algal cells, the FlowCam Cyano revealed the entire water sample to be dominated by a single species of blue-green algae called Microcystis and identified it as the culprit in Florida’s state of emergency.

“It’s very common for one species of cyanobacteria to take over a body of water to the exclusion of other species,” said Harry Nelson, vice president, aquatic markets. “Algae blooms happen very quickly, so it’s important to understand the conditions that invite algae growth and monitor the water with an early detection system.”

Since cyanobacteria such as Microcystis also bloom in public drinking water reservoirs and their presence can affect the taste, odor and safety of the water, more than 50 municipalities throughout the United States use the FlowCam Cyano as an early warning system to detect the presence and track the growth of cyanobacteria and other noxious algae. With early detection, the algae may be treated before a potentially dangerous algal bloom ensues.

—supplied by Fluid Imaging Technologies

More Like This…

HOME A.I.M. Archives

Copyright ©2010-2017 AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com. All rights reserved. Permission required to reprint this article in its entirety. Must include copyright statement and live hyperlinks. Contact editorial@algaeindustrymagazine.com. A.I.M. accepts unsolicited manuscripts for consideration, and takes no responsibility for the validity of claims made in submitted editorial.

Visit our 2017 International Reader’s Poll Platinum Sponsors

bigelow mbiolp_link sfcc

From The A.I.M. Archives

— Refresh Page for More Choices
Bioenergy-news.com reports that Volkswagen showcased its algae biogas-powered vehicle at a biogas project based in El Torno Chiclana, a town in south-west Spain. The test...
San Francisco biotech startup New Wave Foods aims to address the impact of overfishing, bycatch, water pollution, slave labor, an animal death toll in the trillions, and ...
Karen Phillips writes for deeperblue.com that algae are the alveoli in the ocean lungs of our planet, vitally important to the health of the seas as home, food source, sa...
Cheryl Katz writes in National Geographic that Iceland’s last living lake balls are disappearing. The fluffy green supersize diatoms as large as a head of cabbage are one...
Since hydrogen fuel cells produce electricity, we are increasingly thinking about hydrogen as a successor to crude oil. But where will the hydrogen come from? Its ecologi...
Algae Health Sciences, Inc., a subsidiary of BGG, has announced that it has submitted a New Dietary Ingredient (NDI) to the US FDA for its flagship product AstaZine® Natu...
Nicolas Sainte-Foie writes for Labiotech.eu about French startup Algopack manufacturing bio-based plastics made from brown algae. Founded by Rémy Lucas in 2010 and manage...
Joy Lanzendorfer reports for NPR that, as seaweed continues to gain popularity for its nutritional benefits and culinary versatility, more people are taking up seaweed fo...
Researchers at Iowa State University, in Ames, Iowa, are developing technology, using algae, that improves the efficiency of wastewater reclamation. The system uses verti...
Kailua-Kona, Hawaii-based Cellana, Inc., a leading developer of algae-based products for sustainable nutrition and energy applications, and Living Ink Technologies of Den...
Essen, Germany-based Evonik, and Royal DSM, headquartered in Kaiseraugst, Switzerland, have announced their intention to establish a joint venture for omega-3 fatty acid ...
For algal biofuels to compete with petroleum, farming algae has to become less expensive. Toward that goal, Sandia National Laboratories is testing strains of algae for r...