go to http://www.aocs.org! Visit us at algaelabsystems.comA biological resource that drives one of the great engines of planetary control Visit  cricatalyst.com!Looking for Algae Industry Research?

Innovations

Algae’s excellent opportunity for bakers

June 22, 2014
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Food analyst Pinar Hosafci writes in euromonitor.com that while seaweed is an important food source, especially in Asia, its use in baked goods is unheard of. With the recent discovery of brown algae as a replacement for salt, this situation could change.

Algal ingredients can be particularly valuable in bread, which, according to Euromonitor International, accounted for 29% of global sodium chloride use in 2012. In addition, seaweed ingredients also fit well with the growing consumer demand for natural products, and help to lower blood pressure. A recent study also linked brown algae to a reduction in abdominal fat in humans. As governments struggle to bring down soaring obesity rates and manufacturers battle to rejuvenate tumbling bread sales, brown algae could offer the solution they both long for. But where will this work?

Globally, almost 90% of all salt consumed as an ingredient stems from packaged food. Some 35% of sodium chloride use derives from baked goods alone, of which bread accounts for the largest proportion. Given the sheer volume used in bread, any attempt to replace it with a viable alternative would make commercial sense. Brown algae are a viable alternative not only because they provide a sodium substitute but also because they fulfill a nutritional function.

Algae powder has the potential to play a role in fighting obesity as well as helping to reduce cholesterol and manage blood sugar levels. However, extracting algae remains very costly and complex. According to the FAO, the estimated cost of algal production alone ranges from US$4-300 per kg of dry biomass, which is quite high given the fact that table salt retails for less than US$1 per kg. Therefore, its use will be primarily limited to high-income countries

Daily sodium intake via bread vs. obesity and overweight population in selected countries Source: Euromonitor International

Daily sodium intake via bread vs. obesity and overweight population in selected countries Source: Euromonitor International


*Note: Countries were selected based on their 2013 per capita incomes with a cut-off level of US$15,000.)

Many Western European countries, such as Germany, the Netherlands and Italy, along with the United Arab Emirates, appear to be those with very high rates of obese and overweight people and a high daily intake of sodium through bread. With a 27% share of global consumption, Western Europe ranks first in terms of global use of the ingredient in bread. Therefore, Western European countries offer the best opportunities for ingredient and packaged food manufacturers.

Sustainability is a valid concern for food producers. As part of this, many suppliers are already looking at algae as a future solution. However, manufacturers may think that algae might not be worth the high production costs because of the (perceived) inferior taste and appearance.

Read More

More Like This…

HOME Algae Industry Jobs

Copyright ©2010-2013 AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com. All rights reserved. Permission granted to reprint this article in its entirety. Must include copyright statement and live hyperlinks. Contact editorial@algaeindustrymagazine.com. A.I.M. accepts unsolicited manuscripts for consideration, and takes no responsibility for the validity of claims made in submitted editorial.

From The A.I.M. Archives

— Refresh Page for More Choices
Phys.org reports that, in collaboration with the Berlin, Germany LED manufacturer FutureLED, scientists at the Technische Universität München have developed a unique comb...
Cyanobacteria, also known as blue-green algae because of their color, have endured for more than 2.5 billion years, providing ample time to adapt to changes in the Earth'...
In an age where customer input is as easy as a click, OriginOil has tapped directly into its intended market to R&D their next generation algae harvester -- with a de...
Fort Myers, FL-based Algenol, and India's Reliance Industries Ltd., have deployed India’s first Algenol algae production platform. The demonstration module is located nea...
Nutritionaloutlook.com this month gives a well-rounded survey of how algae’s uses in food, beverage, and supplements keep expanding. Here is an excerpt: Thanks to the 201...
Using a malaria parasite protein produced from algae, paired with an immune-boosting cocktail suitable for use in humans, researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine g...
Don Willmott writes in Huffington Post about Nevada-based Algae Systems, which has built a test plant on Alabama's Mobile Bay to not only turn algae into diesel fuel but ...
The European (FP7) algae project Sustainable PoLymers from Algae Sugars and Hydrocarbons (SPLASH) has been developing a platform technology for the conversion of third ge...
K. S. Rajgopal writes in thehindu.com about a new study that demonstrates how macroalgal biomass from Gelidiella acerosa and Gracilaria dura collected from Adri and Verav...
None of us would be alive if sperm cells didn’t know how to swim, or if the cilia in our lungs couldn’t prevent fluid buildup. But we know very little about the dynamics ...
In one of the first studies to examine the potential for using municipal wastewater as a feedstock for algae-based biofuels, Rice University scientists found they could e...
Scientists from the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI), a not-for-profit genomic research organization in La Jolla, California, have published a paper outlining new synthet...
John O’Renick, in this insightful piece from the Portland (Oregon) Tribune, writes about the problems we create from treating waste streams as garbage to be disposed of i...
Natacha Tatu writes in Worldcrunch about a 72-year old French chef who has taken on the challenge of bringing spirulina to the malnourished youth of the Central Africa. F...
EnAlgae researchers have published an economic model to help to explore the economics of cultivating macroalgae at sea. The model and report can be found here as outputs ...