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Algaeon strikes nutraceutical deal

September 16, 2013
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Algaeon Inc. Indianapolis, IN-based Algaeon Inc. has announced their signing of a multi-year, multi-million dollar supply agreement with Valensa International, of Eustis, FL, which provides high value “condition specific” nutraceuticals to the marketplace. Algaeon will develop manufacturing processes and technology while Valensa will produce finished form condition specific products that will be sold to marketers with recognized brands.

“Algaeon is thrilled to be working together with Valensa, a global leader in nutraceutical formulation for the human supplement market, and we are looking forward to bringing our exciting technology to the market,” said Paul DeLacey Chairman & CEO, Algaeon Inc. “We are confident that our combined strengths will allow us to move quickly and make a significant impact on the ‘condition specific’ nutraceutical market.”

According to Dr. Rudi E. Moerck, President and CEO of Valensa, the algae technology relationship with Algaeon provides a significant additional supplier of algae biomass and extracts to Valensa to allow the company to grow its portfolio of advanced condition specific products. “Valensa is a rapidly growing nutraceutical company with a thriving astaxanthin-based, condition-specific formulation business,” said Moerck. “We are excited and confident that this collaboration with Algaeon will provide additional algae sourced ingredients to Valensa to ultimately expand its offerings beyond Spirulina and Astaxanthin. We share Algaeon’s vision and commitment to delivering high quality algae products for improved human health to the market,” he added.

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