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Algae.Tec Shoalhaven One

Algae.Tec Shoalhaven One (south of Sydney) algae to biofuels showcase facility commissioned on August 2, 2012.

Algae.Tec Commissions Shoalhaven One

August 2, 2012
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Australia’s first advanced engineered algae to biofuels facility, Shoalhaven One, was officially opened August 2, 2012 by the New South Wales Minister for Resources and Energy, the Honourable Chris Hartcher, MP.

Executives from the University of Wollongong, the Manildra Group, the renewable energy investment community, shareholders and coal and biofuels association representatives attended the official ceremony at Nowra, south of Sydney.

Algae.Tec, an advanced algae to biofuels company, is based around a high-yield, enclosed and scalable algae growth and harvesting system, called the McConchie-Stroud System. The Shoalhaven One facility is connected into the Manildra Group waste carbon dioxide, which is used in the algae growth process.

Shoalhaven One facility

Energy Minister Chris Hartcher (on right), with Algae.Tec executive chairman Roger Stroud, launches the Shoalhaven One facility

The company announced that leading inspection, verification, testing and certification services company, SGS, will now undertake the third party yield validation process.

Executive Chairman Roger Stroud said the company offers NSW and Australia energy security at a time when traditional fossil fuel companies are leaving the local market. “Algae.Tec offers the promise of home grown transport fuels (aviation and diesel), which is the number one energy security priority for countries like the USA and increasingly Australia.”

Founded in 2007, Algae.Tec has offices in Atlanta, Georgia and Perth, Western Australia. The company recently recruited biofuels and aviation fuels specialist engineer Colin McGregor as General Manager Project Operations.

Photos: Ross Pulford for Algae.Tec

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