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Health & Nutrition

Algae snacks on Shark Tank

November 14, 2016
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

ENERGYbits Founder and CEO Catharine Arnston

ENERGYbits Founder and CEO Catharine Arnston pitches her algae tablets called “bits” to the Sharks on “Shark Tank.”

If you’re a fan of the television show “Shark Tank”, you won’t want to miss the episode that airs this Friday, November 18th 9:00-10:00 p.m. EST on ABC Television, when Catharine Arnston, Founder/CEO of Boston’s ENERGYbits® makes her pitch. Will the Sharks eat the algae? — or eat her alive?

Plant-based nutrition company ENERGYbits beat out 40,000 other entrepreneurs, says Ms. Arnston, for their spot on “Shark Tank,” the most watched television show on Friday nights, averaging 10 million viewers per episode.

Ms. Arnston pitches the plant-based, high protein algae tablets to the Sharks as the easiest, most natural way for health-conscious consumers and athletes to improve energy, hunger and health without caffeine, chemicals or sugar, and a food-based replacement for vitamins and supplements.

Six years ago the company started educating consumers and athletes about algae’s benefits. They call their tablets “bits” because they are “dried bits of food” like raisins, nuts or kale chips. Their bits are organically grown, have just one ingredient and one calorie and contain forty vitamins/minerals, more protein than steak, more antioxidants than cherries, more iron than spinach, more beta carotene than carrots and more calcium than milk.

“ENERGYbits are 100% spirulina, an algae that satisfies hunger; provides a steady stream of energy; and improves endurance, strength and mental focus,” says Ms. Arnston. “RECOVERYbits® are 100% chlorella, an algae that provides rapid recovery, repairs muscles, removes toxins, slows the aging process and builds the immune system; all without chemicals, sugar, caffeine, gluten or stomach distress.”

So will the “Sharks” take the bait and put their money into algae bits? Tune in this Friday, November 18 at 9 pm/ET to find out.

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