Algae 101 Part 33

Prince Charles, the Future of Food and Algae

August 14, 2011
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Prince Charles has advocated sustainable agriculture with less dependence on fossil resources for over 30 years. He shared his insights in a keynote address at the Georgetown University Future of Food Conference in May 2011. He conveyed his motivation as:

I have no intention of being confronted by my grandchildren, demanding to know why on earth we didn’t do something about the many problems that existed when we knew what was going wrong. The threat of that question, the responsibility of it is precisely why I have gone on challenging the assumptions of our day. And I would urge you, if I may, to do the same because we need to face up to asking whether how we produce our food is actually fit for purpose in the very challenging circumstances of the twenty-first century.

We must take care of the earth that sustains us because if we don’t do that; if we do not work within nature’s system, then nature will fail to be the durable continuously sustaining force she has always been. Only by safeguarding nature’s resilience, can we hope to have a resilient form of food production and insure food security in the long term. This, then, is the challenge facing us.

Prince Charles

Prince Charles

Prince Charles provided evidence of scarcity and unsustainability for each of the fossil resources required to produce industrial foods. He advocates for genuinely sustainable agriculture for the long term that replenishes soil and water, is not dependent upon the use of chemical pesticides, fungicides and insecticides nor artificial fertilizers, growth promoters or GE monocultures. He notes that we must reduce the use of those substances that are dangerous and harmful, not only to human health but to the health of those natural systems such as the oceans, forests and wetlands.

He reports that yield increases for staple food crops are declining from 3% in the 1960s to less than 1% today. For the first time, yield increases are less than the rate of population growth. Yields are suffering in Africa, China and India, where crops are failing to cope with ever-increasing temperatures and fluctuating rainfall. Yield failures have caused the cost of food to skyrocket. Set against these threats to yields is the ever-growing demand for food. The United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization estimates that the demand will rise by 70% by 2050.

Prince Charles recognizes that food production concentrated in large farms distant from consumers puts our food supply in jeopardy. A single weather or geological event could destroy large food supplies. In addition, with increasing fuel scarcity and cost, long distance food transportation will not be possible. He advocates a more resilient system were many smaller growers produce food close to consumers. He notes “…strengthening small farm production could be a major force in preserving the traditional knowledge and biodiversity that we lose at our peril.”

He cited the impeccably well researched International Assessment of Agricultural Knowledge, Science and Technology for Development, IAASTD, conducted in 2008 by the U.N. The report, co-chaired by Professor Hans Herren, drew on evidence from more than four hundred scientists worldwide and concluded that small scale, family-based farming systems adopting so-called agri-ecological approaches were among the most productive systems in developing countries.

Industrial Agriculture

Industrial Agriculture

Prince Charles notes that the industrialized food system receives accolades and subsidies even though it is unfit for purpose because it is deeply dependent on fossil fuels and chemical treatments. Sustainable organic production is rubbished and condemned as unfit for purpose. He observes that big agribusinesses drive agricultural policy to reward themselves—at the expense of family farmers. Consumers are fooled by apparently cheap food because they do not understand the cost of subsidies. He points out that, under the current inherently unsustainable system in the developed world, we actually throw away approximately 40% of the food we have bought. When food does not reflect its real cost, consumers waste food.

Less than 3% of the food sold in the U.S. is organic, due to the difficulty in making sustainable farming more profitable for producers and sustainable food more affordable for consumers. Prince Charles created an International Sustainability Unit to study why sustainable food production systems struggle to make a profit, and why intensively produced food costs less. The ISU study reveals two reasons – subsidies and accounting. The U.S. system of farm subsidies overwhelmingly favors those kinds of agriculture techniques that are responsible for the many problems associated with industrial agriculture. In addition, the cost of ecosystem damage is not reflected in the price of food production. When fertilizers and pesticides pollute the water supply, the water must be cleaned up at enormous cost. Those costs are paid in water bills, not food costs. The primary polluter is not charged. Air, water and soil polluters are not charged for their social cost. Foolish subsidies and failure to create pollution policies have led to a situation where farmers are better off using intensive methods that are unsustainable and extremely pollutive.

Consumers who would prefer to buy sustainably produced food are unable to do so because of the price or availability. There are many producers and consumers who want to do the right thing. As things stand, growers are penalized for doing the right thing. Price Charles recommends re-examining the U.S. food subsidies. He recommends that subsidies be redirected to benefit sustainable systems. Shifting subsidies would be a more honest form of accounting and make it more desirable for producers to operate sustainably.

Food Waste

Food Waste

The U.S. needs a Secretary of Agriculture with the courage to redirect subsidies and show the real cost of food, including extraction, health impacts and pollution. We also need research, development, demonstration and diffusion of freedom foods. Freedom foods provide sustainable and affordable local food and energy production. Freedom foods offer an alternative food supply that follows the path recommended by Prince Charles.

Freedom foods
Freedom foods reinvent our food supply from the foundation of the food chain and liberate consumers to make smart choices for healthier, delicious food. Food grown low on the food chain free us from the consumption, waste and pollution caused by modern industrial foods. These foods are clean, healthy, nutrient dense and low in fat and cholesterol. They offer twice the protein of food grains as well as higher levels of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. Consumers do not have free choice today because freedom foods are not widely available yet.

Freedom foods enable:

Freedom foods empower growers and consumers to eat healthy food and leave the ecological footprint of a butterfly. Freedom foods represent the first new form of agriculture in 60 years.

Algae Industry Magazine readers may download a color PDF of Freedom Foods free.  For teachers, students and food and energy policy leaders, please share how your students react to Freedom Foods. We need a revolution to transform our food supply and we need your help!

Go to Page

Copyright ©2010-2011 AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com. All rights reserved. Permission granted to reprint this article in its entirety. Must include copyright statement and live hyperlinks. Contact editorial@algaeindustrymagazine.com. A.I.M. accepts unsolicited manuscripts for consideration, and takes no responsibility for the validity of claims made in submitted editorial.

Visit the A.I.M. Archives

AIM interview ArchivesAlgae 101 ArchivesHot Products ArchivesInnovations ArchivesMoney ArchivesProcess ArchivesResearch ArchivesScale Up ArchivesThe Buzz Archives

FREE Algae News & Updates

Sign up to receive breaking A.I.M. updates!

From The A.I.M. Archives

— Refresh Page for More Choices
University of Adelaide researchers are using nanotechnology and the fossils of diatoms to develop a novel chemical-free and resistance-free way of protecting stored grain...
Scientists at the Energy Department’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have demonstrated that just two of six iron-sulfur-containing ferredoxins in a represent...
Algae.Tec Ltd has received its first purchase order from Reliance Industrial Investments and Holdings Limited (RIIHL), in connection with the arrangements announced on Ja...
Libourne, France-based Fermentalg, an industrial biotechnology company that specializes in the production of oils and proteins derived from microalgae, has completed a su...
“Proterro has reached its Q1 sugar-production pilot milestones,” CEO Kef Kasdin reported at the recent Advanced Biofuels Leadership Conference, in Washington, D.C. “In fo...
By sending algae into space, a U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientist and his team will be able to study some of the key mechanisms that control plant growth and...
The Guardian reports that Prince Edward Island (P.E.I.), Canada-based Solarvest has created an inventive system utilizing a specific algal strain to grow and produce EPA ...
Starting in the early 70s, agencies in the former USSR invested more than 20,000 person-years of research and development to produce Bio-Algae Concentrates (BAC) that hel...
A recent discovery in the multicellular green alga, Volvox carteri,has revealed the origin of male and female sexes, showing how they evolved from a more primitive mating...
Perth, Western Australia-based Algae.Tec Limited has announced that the Reliance Group has converted the first tranche of options following the positive progress achieved...
In an effort to propel the algae industry forward, the Algae Testbed Public Private Partnership (ATP3) offers a series of hands-on specialized workshops suited for partic...
Following a request from the European Commission, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) was recently asked t...
Matthew Carr was recently named executive director of the Algae Biomass Organization (ABO), the leading trade association for the algae industry. His presence will soon b...
The EPA has released the Annual Use of Pesticides in the U.S. Report. We now know that American farmers apply roughly a billion pounds of toxic chemicals intentionally in...
Using a combination of satellite imagery and laboratory experiments, researchers have evidence showing that viruses infecting those algae are driving the life-and-death d...
Biplab Das reports in NatureAsia.com that a research team has found aqueous extracts of the marine brown algae Lobophoro variegate that can inhibit the replication of hum...
Analia Murias 
reports for fis.com that Chilean exports of products made from macroalgae generated a total of $195 million US in the first seven months of 2014, according...
With their new CO₂ processing-platform called AstaCos, AlgaeBiotech can produce waxy particles of only 50-100 µm in size with a loading of 25% astaxanthin oleoresin. The ...