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AEE Adopts OriginOil EWS Harvesting Technology

September 25, 2013
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Electro Water Separation™ (EWS), is a high-speed, chemical free process that efficiently extracts organic contaminants from water.

Electro Water Separation™ (EWS), is a high-speed, chemical free process that efficiently extracts organic contaminants from water.

Algae Enviro-Engineering (AEE), a Singapore-based photobioreactor systems provider and algae food producer, has adopted OriginOil’s Electro Water SeparationTM (EWS) technology for its algae production plant in Jurong, Singapore. AEE is developing a model for integrated algae-aquaculture sites throughout urban locations in Singapore, with a focus on the economically sustainable development of aquaculture in Southeast Asia.

“After evaluating OriginOil’s portfolio, our technical team felt that OriginOil had some novel, scalable, and potentially game-changing technologies for carbon sequestration, algae production and aquaculture management,” said Edwin Teo, Algae Enviro-Engineering Director. “We are excited about the opportunity to work closely…our expectation is to have this facility in revenue this year.”

AEE’s commercial products include the uniquely enhanced AEE Spirulina Probiotic Premix, which is designed to be incorporated into animal feed, and Spirulina Probiotic Premix, which has been used to help treat mastitis in cows and to enhance their immune systems; to improve weight and growth rates in fish; and to increase egg production and overall growth rates in poultry.

“Singapore is a great place to develop a synergic algae-aquaculture organic, sustainable biomass production project,” said Jose Sanchez, OriginOil’s Vice President of Quality Assurance and Services. “Given its tropical location, which provides abundant sunlight, steady mild temperature and access to wastewater, Singapore is the one of the best locations to grow algae in the world.”

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