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ABO Says “Don’t Drain Lincoln Memorial Pool”

October 3, 2012
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Lincoln Memorial Pool

The Lincoln Memorial Pool

The Algae Biomass Organization (ABO) has urged the National Park Service to delay draining the algae in the Lincoln Memorial Pool. Based on estimates, according to the ABO, the pool could produce more than 1.5 million gallons of low carbon, domestic fuel per year if it were used exclusively for algae production.

“While we would never advocate using the Pool to produce algae full time, it is a highly visual reminder that the attributes of algae which frustrate consumers are the very same that make algae ideal as an industrial raw material,” said Mary Rosenthal, Executive Director of the Algae Biomass Organization. “Algae grow in a variety of places, multiply fast, and need only sunlight and CO2 to grow. Best of all, fuels made from algae work in existing engines with no modification.”

Currently more than 200 companies, labs, research institutions and entrepreneurs across the country are developing technologies to convert algae into fuels, feed and food, the ABO points out in their communications to Washington legislators. With new production facilities planned or operating from Pennsylvania to New Mexico and from Florida to Hawaii, and many other places, algae-based fuels and other products are emerging as a new opportunity to create jobs and alternatives to imported fuel.

“We’re hard at work showing the world that algae will have a significant impact across many sectors of our economy, from chemicals and plastics, to health foods and nutraceuticals, to animal feed and renewable fuels,” said Rosenthal.

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