The Buzz

ABO and U. of Minn to Showcase Algae Industry North

September 28, 2011
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

The Algal Biomass Organization (ABO) is partnering with the University of Minnesota to offer a unique workshop and tour for attendees of the 5th annual Algae Biomass Summit, to be held 
October 24–27 at the Hyatt Regency Minneapolis.

The October 24 workshop, titled “Algae—A Midwest and Northern Climes Perspective,” will feature presentations by experts on algae growth in northern climates, as well as a tour of the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory at the University of Minnesota, and virtual tours of two algae-industry firms operating in the region: Algaedyne and BioProcess Algae.

“The research and commercialization taking place here in Minnesota demonstrates that algae for energy really is a 50-state economic development and job creation engine,” said Mary Rosenthal, Executive Director of the ABO. “This workshop and tour will showcase innovative approaches to benefitting from algae even in colder climates.”

“The growing algae industry, and the biofuels and other products that come from it, will play a role in the economic development of Minnesota and the surrounding region,” said John Sheehan, Scientific Director for Biofuels and the Global Environment with the University of Minnesota’s Initiative for Renewable Energy and the Environment. “We’re excited to show attendees how this region—and the University of Minnesota in particular—is making a unique contribution to the industry.”

Go to HOME Page

Copyright ©2010-2015 AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com. All rights reserved. Permission granted to reprint this article in its entirety. Must include copyright statement and live hyperlinks. Contact editorial@algaeindustrymagazine.com. A.I.M. accepts unsolicited manuscripts for consideration, and takes no responsibility for the validity of claims made in submitted editorial.

From The A.I.M. Archives

— Refresh Page for More Choices
The water sample taken from the St. Lucie River near the coastline of Ft. Pierce, Florida was loaded with blue-green algae when it arrived in Ben Spaulding’s lab in Scarb...
For plants and algae that carry on photosynthesis, light can be too much of a good thing. On a bright, sunny day, a plant might only be able to utilize 20 percent or less...
Jill Fehrenbacher writes in inhabitat.com that when it comes to design, Mother Nature has a lot to teach us. The field of Biodesign has emerged as an exciting new discipl...
Global Algae Innovations, with headquarters in San Diego, California, and cultivation/production facilities in Lihue, Hawaii, have introduced a new algae harvesting syste...
The Energy Department (DOE) has announced the selection of six projects for up to $12.9 million in federal funding, entitled, “Project Definition for Pilot- and Demonstra...
Kailua-Kona, Hawaii-based Cellana, Inc., a leading developer of algae-based products for sustainable nutrition and energy applications, and Living Ink Technologies of Den...
Dan Wood, at the University of Connecticut, writes that assistant extension educator of marine aquaculture at UConn’s Avery Point Campus, Anoushka Concepcion, spoke about...
For algal biofuels to compete with petroleum, farming algae has to become less expensive. Toward that goal, Sandia National Laboratories is testing strains of algae for r...
Almost two years ago, on June 28, 2015, the rocket carrying experiments from Chatfield High School to the International Space Station disintegrated 139 seconds into its f...
David Erickson writes in the (Montana) Missoulian that Clearas Water Recovery, a Missoula tech company formed eight years ago, has developed a patented process to use alg...
The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has announced the selection of three projects to receive up to $8 million, aimed at reducing the costs of producing algal biofuels and...
Washington State University researchers have developed a biofilm reactor to grow algae more efficiently, and make the algae more viable for several industries, including ...