Can seaweeds clean up our mess?

Can seaweeds clean up our mess?

Karen Phillips writes for deeperblue.com that algae are the alveoli in the ocean lungs of our planet, vitally important to the health of the seas as home, food source, sanctuary and above all the source of over half the oxygen on this planet. In coral seas there are two main kinds of flora – the microalgae that live within the coral…

The long winding road to algae’s promised land

The long winding road to algae’s promised land

Algae Industry Magazine contributing editor, emeritus agribusiness professor at Arizona State University, and algae industry icon Mark Edwards is interviewed this month in nutraingredients-usa.com on how and why the algae industry has a history of over promising and under delivering…

Algae adds traction for new surfboards

Algae adds traction for new surfboards

Alexander Haro, Senior Editor for Inertia, reports that Slater Designs and Firewire Surfboards are collaborating with BLOOM Foam to make “arguably the most environmentally-friendly traction pad on the market today.” In general, Mr. Haro says, “Surfing is a bit of an environmental disaster, involving toxic surfboards…

Virginia startup pitching new spirulina drink

Virginia startup pitching new spirulina drink

Katie Demeria at the Richmond Times-Dispatch reports that Virginia native Elliot Roth wants people to drink spirulina.“It’s a highly efficient food source, and it can grow practically anywhere,” says Mr. Roth, a 2015 graduate of Virginia Commonwealth University and founder and CEO of Spira…

Deep Green Biotech Hub incubator launched in NSW

Deep Green Biotech Hub incubator launched in NSW

In Australia, the New South Wales Deep Green Biotech Hub (DGBH) has been launched as an enabling incubator environment to foster the development of algae as a cost effective and sustainable resource. The incubator will facilitate a diverse range of products including nutritional supplements, cosmetics, industrial…

New algae-delivered vaccination technology for fish

New algae-delivered vaccination technology for fish

Peter O’Dwyer writes in the Irish Examiner that approximately 5% of the world’s fish stock is lost to infectious disease at a cost of more than $10+ billion annually. MicroSynbiotiX, headquartered in Cork City, Ireland, has developed an oral vaccine hidden within microalgae that fish eat, aiming to reduce those losses significantly…

Demand booming in China for algal EPA-fortified eggs

Demand booming in China for algal EPA-fortified eggs

EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) fortified eggs are developing quite a demand among middle and upper-class consumers in China. With clinical trials demonstrating that EPA can improve blood circulation and reduce the formation of blood clots, among many other positive attributes, retailors in major cities including Beijing…

AFA: From Horse Food to Wellness Trend

AFA: From Horse Food to Wellness Trend

Katie Van Syckle writes in New York Magazine that, as a heath-food trend, many swear by blue-green algae’s (BGA’s) energy-boosting properties. In health-food circles, BGA usually refers to spirolina, chlorella, or a quickly rising star by the name of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (AFA). Spirulina has been on the market for…

New Zealand culture collection moves to new home

New Zealand culture collection moves to new home

In New Zealand is an internationally significant collection of microalgae cultures known as the Cawthron Institute Culture Collection of Microalgae (CICCM). The CICCM was recently moved into a new home in Cawthron Institute’s recently built Envirotech building in central Nelson. The laboratory includes cabinets…

Spirulina growing natural food colors market

Spirulina growing natural food colors market

The global natural food colors market was valued at US$1.2 Billion in 2015, and is expected to grow by 6.8% to reach US$1.3 Billion in 2016. North America and Western Europe are the two largest markets for natural food coloring according to a new market study, collectively accounting… [Read the full story]

Toxic blue-green algae adapting to rising CO2

Toxic blue-green algae adapting to rising CO2

A team of microbiologists at the University of Amsterdam (UvA) are reporting that many toxin-producing algal varieties are even more adept at handling changing climatic conditions than scientists previously thought. This finding is reported in the journal PNAS this week, and has implications for clean drinking water, swimming…

Algal blooms — finding the culprit

Algal blooms — finding the culprit

The water sample taken from the St. Lucie River near the coastline of Ft. Pierce, Florida was loaded with blue-green algae when it arrived in Ben Spaulding’s lab in Scarborough, Maine. As laboratory manager for Fluid Imaging Technologies, Mr. Spaulding ran the thick, green sample through the company’s FlowCam Cyano…

Studying the ALS-algae link

Studying the ALS-algae link

Mike Cote writes in the New Hampshire Union Leader that the link between ALS and cyanobacteria present in algae blooms was first traced to Guam in the 1950s, according to Dr. Elijah Stommel, a professor of neurology at Dartmouth’s Geisel School of Medicine. Stommel is working with Applied GeoSolutions of Newmarket…